lebre con castañas…

LEBRE CON CASTAÑAS (HARE WITH CHESTNUTS)

As i have mentioned in the past, am a firm believer in being able to deal directly with whatever it is you choose to eat…especially meat. My mum (a professional chef for more than 50 years now) was given a brace of wild hare recently and this is how she chose to deal with them.

OVERNIGHT
Having already been hung for a few days for the meat to mature, you must skin your hare (it has already been gutted – you do this in the field directly after you have killed it – just as you should to with venison). You split the skin at one hind leg and run the slit along to the other back leg, cutting off the tail as you go…then you pull the skin down, this should allow you to pull it all off with a bit of effort right down to the head. I am for chopping off the head personally, in the butchers where i sometimes live in Italy they like to display their rabbits skinned, head in tact, with eyes…well it’s all a bit too David Lynch even for me!

So, now you joint your hare and marinade it overnight in some good olive oil, white wine (v important that it’s white for the marinade as it helps to draw any remaining blood from the hare), red wine, fresh parsley, chopped onion, carrot and celery and some black pepper…

NEXT DAY
Shake off the marinade and roll your jointed hare in some seasoned flour and brown well in a heavy based frying pan.

In another roomy casserole gently saute some chopped onion, leek, garlic, celery, carrots and red pepper till softened. Add your browned meat to the casserole, meanwhile de-glaze the frying pan with some dry white sherry (Tio Pepe is excellent), some red wine and add a tablespoon or so of the seasoned flour mixture along with a tablespoon of sweet Spanish paprika.

Add this to the casserole along with some good stock and allow to come to the boil, salt to taste and  place in a slow oven for around 2 and a hall hours or until the meat is tender.

When the casserole is almost done you can add a generous splash of port to the dish along with some whole chestnuts (frozen are fine) cook for five minutes and then garnish…

Garnish the dish with croutons made from bread and potatoes…

other foody posts on this blog:

callos a la gallega

ossobuco vs xerrete

in praise of colombian food

restaurant still lives

few flowered recipes

first forage of the season

nose to tail and farajullas

flloeira

cocido gallego

albariño wine genius

chorizos

returning to the matanza

chocolate con churros

pani puri sunday

cicchetti tea-break

baracca

empanada

revelations in a milanese restaurant

further adventures in foraging

cooking the haul

foraging2

foraging

nose to tail,

(s)light relief,

pulpo a la gallega

the matanza

morcilla and dying arts

jamòn serrano

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s