Tag Archives: galician food

tortilla de maiz y chicharrones or what to do with that maize flour…

…So you have ground your maize as in the previous post (or gone to the supermarket and bought a bag!). What to do with it? Here is something super old school and Galician you can do with your maize flour. Tortilla de maiz y chicharrones  is a bit like a cross between a thick savoury crepe and a flattened Yorkshire pudding made from a maize rich batter and flecked with onions and confit pork (the aforementioned chicharrones). With the inclusion of pork, this dish would have been a bit of a luxury in an ordinary countryside household at one time, far more likely it would have been made with just the batter and maybe a few onions and/or some pork fat. ANYWAY regardless it’s fantastic comfort food, though quite wintry and heavy…so save the recipe for chilly times:

ingredients:

a little pork lard (for frying)

some sliced pre fried (but not coloured) onions

some chicharrones (or try some fatty cubed pancetta)

300 g maize flour

150 g strong plain flour

2 – 3 eggs

water

salt

These ingredients are approximations, for method see short film above.

P1170887

other foody posts on this blog:

tortilla de maiz y chicharrones  fabada asturiana  lemons mrs beeton and colombia merluza-a-la-cazuela lebre con castañas callos a la gallega ossobuco vs xerrete in praise of colombian food restaurant still lives few flowered recipes first forage of the season nose to tail and farajullas flloeira cocido gallego albariño wine genius chorizos returning to the matanza chocolate con churros pani puri sunday cicchetti tea-break baracca empanada revelations in a milanese restaurant further adventures in foraging cooking the haul foraging2 foraging nose to tail (s)light relief pulpo a la gallega the matanza morcilla and dying arts jamòn serrano

merluza a la cazuela…

Merluza a la Cazuela (oven baked hake)

Hake is eaten a lot in Galicia, it is great for baking as it has a firm, sweet, meaty flesh and is a good substitute for cod (though in this recipe any firm white fish will do). It is traditionally cooked in a clay dish (a cazuela) and everything seems to taste better when cooked in earthenware…however of course you can use any oven proof dish…

Here is how Carmen (mum to me) makes it…

To make the sauce:

Chop 3 onions, 1 garlic clove and 1 small red pepper add to olive oil in a pan and sauté gently till tender (not brown). Add black pepper, some mixed herbs, parsley and a little dry white wine or dry sherry, some sweet paprika, a squeeze of lemon juice and 4 tbsp of fish stock (you could use chicken stock also). Leave to simmer for a few minutes till all ingredients are amalgamated, add salt to taste.

Meanwhile fry some thick cut potato slices till partially cooked, then remove from oil and use then to line  the base of your cazuela or oven proof dish (add a little salt). Add a little fish stock to the potatoes.

Place your thickly sliced hake pieces over the potatoes, season them and  spoon over generous amounts of the sauce. Place in a hot oven for 10-15 minutes, when the fish is nearly cooked take out of the oven and add some large white asparagus chunks (tinned or fresh and blanched), some thick red pepper slices and a few peas, return to the oven for another 5 minutes.

Allowing the dish to sit for at least 5 minutes after taking it out of the oven will improve the flavour. Eat along with a chilled glass of albariño or ribeiro wine…

other foody posts on this blog:

lemons mrs beeton and colombia  lebre con castañas callos a la gallega ossobuco vs xerrete in praise of colombian food restaurant still lives few flowered recipes first forage of the season nose to tail and farajullas flloeira cocido gallego albariño wine genius chorizos returning to the matanza chocolate con churros pani puri sunday cicchetti tea-break baracca empanada revelations in a milanese restaurant further adventures in foraging cooking the haul foraging2 foraging nose to tail (s)light relief pulpo a la gallega the matanza morcilla and dying arts jamòn serrano

callos a la gallega…

Callos a la Gallega…i know that callos or tripe as we know it is not top of most peoples culinary lists, but this recipe could convert some of the more squeamish. The tripe in Callos a la Gallega is just one part of a layered, rich, complex and completely delicious stew and is a fine example of traditional Galician cuisine…

Spanish food can be quite complex and even labour intensive and this dish requires a bit of preparation…but it’s worth the effort. There are no amounts in the recipe below, use your own judgement…but make plenty as Callos are even better on the second or third day after cooking…

THE EVENING BEFORE:

Wash the tripe, chop into bite sized pieces and put it in a pan of cold water and bring to the boil for 2 or 3 minutes. Drain, cool and rinse with cold water and plenty of lemon juice. Rinse again with more cold water, dry and then marinade along with a piece of the hoof of a calf or cow (from the knee down – ask your butcher to slice into thick rounds). This hoof part provides plenty of gelatine which will thicken and enrich the final sauce. For the marinade itself use some olive oil, fresh parsley, chopped garlic and black pepper – leave overnight.

At the same time soak some dried chickpeas overnight in cold water.

NEXT DAY

Add a chopped salted pigs trotter to the tripe (in a large sauce pan with lid), a whole unsliced piece of pancetta or smoked bacon, the pre soaked chickpeas and cover it all with some COLD stock or even water give it a stir with a wooden NOT metal spoon… Put on to boil and leave to cook for around 20 minutes, removing any scum that rises to the surface from time to time. Now you can add your spices:
1 teaspoon of cumin
1 teaspoon of mixed spice
2 teaspoons of callos spices (you can make your own by blending cumin, cayenne pepper and a little salt together)
3 whole cloves
1 teaspoon of pimiento picante or chilli pepper
2 envelopes of saffron – powder or strands
Carry on boiling till the meat and the chickpeas are tender…it should all smell very aromatic by now..

Make a rostrido – in a frying pan with some good olive oil, gently fry some sliced garlic till golden brown (be extremely vigilant, it burns very easily). Take the the pan off the heat and allow to cool for a minute or 2 – then add a couple of teaspoons of SPANISH sweet paprika – this cooling off minute is important, if you don’t do it the paprika will burn (incidentally, stick to Spanish for this, it’s way better than the Hungarian variety).

Add this rostrido mixture to the pan of boiling chickpeas etc… At the same time also add to the big pan 3 or 4 chorizo sausages and leave them to cook slowly till the sauce begins to thicken. Also to aid thickening you can add some torn up bread (white, no crusts) to the sauce. Now you can salt to taste and add a little more chilli for an extra kick

Like i said before…make a big pot as callos in my opinion is way better, reheated a day after cooking when all the spices hav had time to develop and the sauce has become even richer…

other foody posts on this blog:

lebre con castanas

ossobuco vs xerrete

in praise of colombian food

restaurant still lives

few flowered recipes

first forage of the season

nose to tail and farajullas

flloeira

cocido gallego

albariño wine genius

chorizos

returning to the matanza

chocolate con churros

pani puri sunday

cicchetti tea-break

baracca

empanada

revelations in a milanese restaurant

further adventures in foraging

cooking the haul

foraging2

foraging

nose to tail,

(s)light relief,

pulpo a la gallega

the matanza

morcilla and dying arts

jamòn serrano